Vol. 5, No. 6, June 2009

It's summer already, more or less. Up here it's in the 90s one day, then we have frost warnings the next. It's nice to be snow and mud-free, though.

This month there are quite a few new hull number photos, an excellent article on the Glencoe model, and a few other things.

If you live in, or are planning to be near, Clayton, New York, you might also be interested in this month's opening of the "Made in Clayton" exhibit at the Antique Boat Museum. It features a chaser model, and a presentation of photos and other items on the vessels built at Clayton, which include WWI subchasers. Opens June 26.

--Todd Woofenden, editor

Notes on the Glencoe Chaser Model

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Featured this month is a highly detailed article by Jack Hudock on building the Glencoe submarine chaser model.

Earlier this year Glencoe re-issued this popular, large-scale model (scale 1:74).

Jack provides start-to-finish notes and a set of excellent illustrations, walking the model builder through a process of tweaks and changes to the fine details. Follow Jack's recommendations, and your model will be much more accurate and better looking.

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Close Aboard Photos

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While you're working on your chaser model, don't forget the Close Aboard section of the site.

In this section are photo scans of fine details of the chasers: high-resolution scans of hand-picked photos that are especially sharp or that offer rare views of particular details.

Need an image of a detail not shown? Contact me, and I will see what I can do.

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USS Sacramento in the Northern Russia Expedition

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This is a bit on the obscure side, but also posted are several examples of correspondence pertaining to the Northern Russia Expedition, which included three chasers.

These documents were posted in the context of some comments about the role of USS Sacramento (one of the other vessels in the expedition), on the Naval Warfare site.

I take issue with the notion that the U.S. / Allied presence in Northern Russia was "ill-conceived," (a fairly typical assertion in accounts of WWI strategy and politics) and propose a somewhat different than standard point of view on the withdrawal of troops in 1919.

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