• Richard Coyle Hasinger, of SC 209

    Hasinger on SC 209October 2007: Submarine chaser service claimed the lives of many sailors: some fell victim to the flu epidemic, a few were swept overboard in storms at sea, and some were killed in engine room fires or other mishaps.

    In the August issue a set of images and an audio podcast was presented, on the ill-fated service of submarine chaser SC 209, the sole case of chaser crewman fatalities from friendly fire.

    Just posted is a rare, early photo of a subchaser crewman who was later killed in the shelling of SC 209. Richard Hasinger, QM 3c, is shown on the deck in a photograph marked as 10 June 1918 at Cape May, New Jersey.

    Two studio portrait photos of Hasinger are also included. Images courtesy of Raymond Hoeffner, grand-nephew of Richard Hasinger.

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  • Arch at Gibraltar

    ArchOctober 2007: Leon Clemmer's notes on the Triumphal Arch at Gibraltar are posted.

    Leon Clemmer's father, Lt. Leon Clemmer, served as ship's surgeon on USS Leonidas, mother ship of the chasers at Corfu.

    The arch at Gibraltar honors "The Achievements and Comradeship of the American and British Navies" in the Great War.

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  • Vol. 3, No. 10, October 2007

    October 2007: This month several more interesting photos are posted, including a rare photograph from the service of SC 209, a nice little pamphlet from the service of SC 83, and a photo of the triumphal arch at Gibraltar. For anyone who will be in southern Maine next month: On Tuesday, November 13, 2007 I will be speaking on the service of subchasers in WWI, at the Portland (Maine) Public Library. I'm not certain of the time yet -- I believe it will be at noon or 1:00 p.m. Check the Subchaser Archives home page closer to the date, and I'll post details. There will also be a small display of items and photos from chaser service (from my own collection), and a full-sized reproduction of the nautical chart used on SC 93 during the Otranto Barrage, showing the pencil-marked "squares" used to identify general attack locations.

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